Saturday, March 31, 2018

Open Access Journal: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture

Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture
ISSN: 2399-1844 (Print) 
ISSN: 2399-1852 (online) 
Volume 2
Table of Contents Articles:
• Nadia Aleotti, Rhodian Amphoras from Butrint (Albania): Dating, Contexts and Trade
• Donald T. Ariel, Imported Hellenistic Stamped Amphora Handles and Fragments from the North Sinai Survey
• Ofra Guri-Rimon, Stone Ossuaries in the Hecht Museum Collection and the Issue of Ossuaries Use for Burial
• Gabriel Mazor & Walid Atrash, Nysa-Scythopolis: The Hellenistic Polis
• Hélène Machline & Yuval Gadot, Wading Through Jerusalem’s Garbage: Chronology, Function, and Formation Process of the Pottery Assemblages of the City’s Early Roman Landfill
• Kyriakos Savvopoulos, Two Hadra Hydriae in the Colection of the Patriarchal Sacristy in Alexandria
• Wolf Rudolph & Michalis Fotiadis, Neapolis Scythica – Simferopol – Test Excavations 1993
Archaeological News and Projects:
• »Dig for a Day« with the Archaeological Seminars Institute
Reviews:
• John Lund, A Study of the Circulation of Ceramics in Cyprus from the 3rd Century BC to the 3rd Century AD (by Brandon R. Olson)
• Gloria London, Ancient Cookware from the Levant. An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective (by John Tidmarsh)
• Michela Spataro & Alexandra Villing (eds.), Ceramics, Cuisine and Culture: The Archaeology and Sience of Kitchen Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom)
• James C. R. Gill, Dakhleh Oasis and the Western Desert of Egypt under the Ptolemies (by Andrea M. Berlin)
• Anna Gamberini, Ceramiche fini ellenistiche da Phoinike. Forme, produzioni, commerce (by Carlo De Mitri)
• Maja Mise, Gnathia and Related Hellenistic Ware on the East Adriatic Coast (by Patricia Kögler)
• Jens-Arne Dickmann & Alexander Heinemann (eds.), Vom Trinken und Bechern. Das antike Gelage im Umbruch (by Stella Drougou)

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Open Access users: by downloading this eBook you are agreeing to our standard terms and conditions available here.
Institutional subscribers: by downloading this eBook you are agreeing to abide by the subscription licence issued to The Institution. Contact your library for further details. If you encounter any issues with your download please contact info@archaeopress.com
Volume 1
Table of Contents:
A Fill from a Potter’s Dump at Morgantina – by Shelley Stone
Trade in Pottery within the Lower Adriatic in the 2nd century BCE – by Carlo De Mitri
Hellenistic Ash Containers from Phoinike (Albania) – by Nadia Aleotti
Pottery Production in Hellenistic Chalkis, Euboea. Preliminary Notes – by Yannis Chairetakis
A Terracotta Figurine of a War Elephant and Other Finds from a Grave at Thessaloniki – by Eleni Lambrothanassi & Annareta Touloumtzidou
Moldmade Bowls from Straton’s Tower (Caesarea Maritima) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom
Greco-Roman Jewellery from the Necropolis of Qasrawet (Sinai) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom

ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECTS
Panathenaic Amphorae of Hellenistic and Roman Times – by Martin Streicher

BOOK REVIEWS
Shelley C. Stone, Morgantina Studies 6. The Hellenistic and Roman Fine Wares – by Peter J. Stone
Pia Guldager Bilde & Mark L. Lawall (eds.), Pottery, Peoples and Places, BSS 16 – by Kathleen Warner Slane
Susan I. Rotroff, Hellenistic Pottery. The Plain Wares, Agora 33 – by Patricia Kögler

Open Access Journal: ASGLE Bulletin

ASGLE Bulletin
The American Society of Greek and Latin Epigraphy (Société americaine d'épigraphie grecque et latine) is a non-profit organization whose purpose is to further research in, and the teaching of, Greek and Latin epigraphy in North America. The Society fosters collaboration in the field and facilitates the exchange of scholarly research and discussion, both in the public forum and in published form. The Society is associated with L’Association Internationale d’Epigraphie grecque et latine (AIEGL).
ASGLE Bulletin 21.2 (December 2017) [Edited by Prof. Laura Gawlinski]
ASGLE Bulletin 21.1 (June 2017) [Edited by Prof. Laura Gawlinski]
ASGLE Bulletin 20.2 (November 2016) [Edited by Prof. Laura Gawlinski]
ASGLE Bulletin_20.1 (March 2016) [Edited by Prof. Laura Gawlinski]
ASGLE Bulletin 19.2 (November 2015) [Edited by Prof. Laura Gawlinski]
ASGLE Bulletin 19.1 (April 2015) [Edited by Prof. Laura Gawlinski]
ASGLE Bulletin 18.2 (November 2014)[Edited by Prof. Laura Gawlinski]
ASGLE Bulletin 18.1 (March 2014) [Edited by Prof. Laura Gawlinski]
ASGLE Bulletin 17.2 (November 2013) [Edited by Prof. Laura Gawlinski]
ASGLE Bulletin 17.1 (May 2013) [Edited by Prof. Laura Gawlinski]
ASGLE Bulletin 16.2 (October 2012) [Edited by Prof. Paul Iversen (Senior Editor), Prof. Laura Gawlinski (Junior Editor)]
ASGLE Bulletin 16.1 (April 2012) [Edited by Prof. Paul Iversen (Senior Editor), Prof. Laura Gawlinski (Junior Editor)]
ASGLE Bulletin 15.2 (October 2011)  [Edited by Prof. Paul Iversen]
ASGLE Bulletin 15.1 (April 2011) [Edited by Prof. Paul Iversen]
ASGLE Bulletin 14.2 (November 2010) [Edited by Prof. Paul Iversen]
ASGLE Bulletin 14.1 (April 2010) [Edited by Prof. Paul Iversen]
ASGLE Bulletin 13.2 (October 2009) [Edited by Prof. Paul Iversen]
ASGLE Bulletin 13.1 (April 2009) [Edited by Prof. Paul Iversen]
ASGLE Bulletin 12.2 (October 2008) [Edited by Prof. Paul Iversen]
ASGLE Bulletin 12.1 (April 2008) [Edited by Prof. Paul Iversen]
ASGLE Bulletin 11.2 (October 2007) [Edited by Prof. Paul Iversen]
ASGLE Bulletin 11.1 (May 2007) [Edited by Prof. Paul Iversen]
ASGLE Bulletin 10.1-2 (2006) [Edited by Prof. Timothy Winters]
ASGLE Newsletter 9.1 (March 2005) [Edited by Prof. Timothy Winters]
ASGLE Newsletter 8.1-2 (2003) [Edited by Prof. Timothy Winters]
ASGLE Newsletter 7.2 (November 2003) [Edited by Prof. Timothy Winters]
ASGLE Newsletter 7.1 (May 2003) [Edited by Prof. Timothy Winters]
ASGLE Newsletter 6.2 (November 2002) [Edited by Prof. Timothy Winters]
ASGLE Newsletter 6.1 (May 2002) [Edited by Prof. Timothy Winters]
ASGLE Newsletter 5.2  (November 2001) [Edited by Prof. Timothy Winters]
ASGLE Newsletter 5.1 (May 2001) [Edited by Prof. Timothy Winters]
ASGLE Newsletter 4.2 (October 2000) [Edited by Prof. Timothy Winters]
ASGLE Newsletter 4.1 (January 2000) [Edited by Prof. Timothy Winters]
ASGLE Newsletter 3.1 (July 1999) [Edited by Prof. Timothy Winters]
ASGLE Newsletter 2.2 (December 1998)
ASGLE Newsletter 2.1 (July 1998)
ASGLE Newsletter 1.1 (November 1997)

Open Access Journal: dPVS: the Digital Proceedings of the Virgil Society

[First posted in AWOL 18 March 2014, updated (new URLs) 31 March 2018]

dPVS: the Digital Proceedings of the Virgil Society
ISSN: 0968-2112
THE Virgil Society was founded in 1943, and its first President, the poet T.S. Eliot, delivered What is a Classic? as his Presidential Address in the following year. The purpose of the Society was and remains to unite all those who cherish the central educational tradition of Western Europe. Of that tradition Virgil is the symbol. Membership is open to all those who are in sympathy, whether they read Latin or not.

There are normally five or six meetings each year in London, held on Saturday afternoons in Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU. 

The speakers include both amateur and professional scholars, many of them Virgilians of international repute. Lectures are followed by refreshments, giving an opportunity to meet the speaker and other members of the Society.

Most lectures are published in full in the Proceedings of the Virgil Society, which also include some reviews of works relevant to Virgil. There is also a Newsletter, which appears twice a year.
Presidential Address, 1948
Virgil Society 1 (1961-1962)
Virgil Society 2 (1962-1963) Virgil Society 3 (1963-1964) Virgil Society 4 (1964-1965) Virgil Society 5 (1965-1966) Virgil Society 6 (1966-1967) Virgil Society 7 (1967-1968) Virgil Society 8 (1968-1969) Virgil Society 9 (1969-1970)
Virgil Society 10 (1970-1971)
Virgil Society 11 (1971-1972)
Virgil Society 12 (1972-1973)
Virgil Society 13 (1973-1974)
Virgil Society 14 (1974-1975)
Virgil Society 15 (1975-1976)
Virgil Society 16 (1976-1977)
Virgil Society 17 (1978-1979)
Virgil Society 18 (1986-1987)
Virgil Society 19 (1988-1989)
Virgil Society 20 (1991-1992)
Virgil Society 21 (1993-1994)
Virgil Society 22 (1996-1997)
Virgil Society 23 (1998-1999)
Virgil Society 24 (2001-2002)
Virgil Society 25 (2004-2005)
Virgil Society 26 (2008-2009)
Virgil Society 27 (2011-2012)
Virgil Society 28 (2013-2014) NEW

Friday, March 30, 2018

Open Access Journal: CLARA Classical Art and Archaeology

CLARA Classical Art and Archaeology
ISSN: 2464-3726
So-called muse, from the Ustinow Collection, Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo. Copyrighted material.
CLARA is an open access journal hosted by the Museum of Cultural History at the University of Oslo and administered by an international Editorial Board. The main objective is to annually publish papers of a high academic quality within the field of Classical Art and Archaeology and to make them accessible to a wide scholarly public.

2016

Cover Clara volum 1

Vol 1 (2016)

CLARA Classical Art and Archaeology Vol. 1
Chief Editor Marina Prusac, PhD, Associate Professor, Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo
Volume Editor Adam Lindhagen, PhD, Stockholm University
Editorial Assistant 1 Astri Karine Lundgren, MA Classical Archaeology, University of Oslo
Editorial Assistant 2 Anette Sættem, Advisor, Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo
For the Editorial Board follow this link.

Cover Image: Close-up image of so-called muse, Roman copy of Hellenistic original. From the Ustinow Collection, probably acquired in Israel, Palestine or Syria. Oslo, Museum of Cultural History, inv. C42183. Photo: Morten Teigen, Museum of Cultural History © 

CLARA is published by way of the Oslo University Library Open Access platform FRITT. All rights and guidelines are available on the periodical’s website.

ISSN: to be added late 2016, after the closure of Volume 1.


2017

Cover Page

Vol 2 (2017)

CLARA Classical Art and Archaeology Vol. 2
Chief Editor Marina Prusac-Lindhagen, PhD, Associate Professor, Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo
Editorial Assistant 1 Astri Karine Lundgren, MA Classical Archaeology, University of Oslo
Editorial Assistant 2 Anette Sættem, Advisor, Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo
For the Editorial Board follow this link.

Cover Image: Close-up image of so-called muse, Roman copy of Hellenistic original. From the Ustinow Collection, probably acquired in Israel, Palestine or Syria. Oslo, Museum of Cultural History, inv. C42183. Photo: Morten Teigen, Museum of Cultural History © 
CLARA is published by way of the Oslo University Library Open Access platform FRITT. All rights and guidelines are available on the periodical’s website.
ISSN: 2464-3726

2018

Cover Page

Vol 3 (2018)

CLARA Classical Art and Archaeology Vol. 3

Cover Image: Female funerary bust from Palmyra. From the Ustinow Collection. Oslo, Museum of Cultural History, inv. C42238. Photo: Lill-Ann Chepstow-Lusty, Museum of Cultural History © 
CLARA is published by way of the Oslo University Library Open Access platform FRITT. All rights and guidelines are available on the periodical’s website.
ISSN: 2464-3726

Online LBG: Lexikon zur byzantinischen Gräzität

[First posted in AWOL 7 October 2014, updated 30 March 2018]

LBG: Lexikon zur byzantinischen Gräzität

Fascicles 1-6
Editor: Erich Trapp
LBGCover
A COLLABORATION BETWEEN THE THESAURUS LINGUAE GRAECAE®
AND THE AUSTRIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES.
This site is the result of a collaboration between the Lexikon zur byzantinischen Gräzität (LBG) published by the Austrian Academy of Sciences (Die Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften) and the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae® (TLG®) at the University of California, Irvine.
The LBG is the foremost lexicographical resource in Byzantine Studies mainly covering the period from the 4th to the 15th century A.D. taken from more than 3,000 texts. Seven fascicles have appeared to date, with one more scheduled to appear in 2016. When completed the dictionary will consist of more than 2,000 printed pages, containing approx. 80,000 lemmata.
In March 2012, the LBG and TLG began conversations about digitizing the existing volumes of LBG and linking them to the TLG texts.  The TLG team (Nick Nicholas, Maria Pantelia and John Salatas) worked on converting the files into XML format and incorporating them into the TLG online system. The first six fascicles have been included in this release covering letters A-P. They can be accessed at: http://stephanus.tlg.uci.edu/lbg.
The LBG was initiated by Erich Trapp – in collaboration with Wolfram Hörandner and Johannes Diethart – in the early 1990s. It became a joint project of the Commission for Byzantine Studies at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the Department of Philology at the University of Bonn and the Department of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies at the University of Vienna, financially supported by the Austrian National Science Fund (FWF).
Astrid Steiner-Weber, Sonja Schönauer and Maria Cassiotou-Panayotopoulos contributed to the project at Bonn University with the financial support of the German Research Foundation (DFG),. The Lexicon is now continued at the Division of Byzantine Research of the Institute for Medieval Research at the Austrian Academy of Sciences under the guidance of Erich Trapp (Vienna/Bonn). Members of the team in Vienna include Carolina Cupane, Andreas Rhoby and Elisabeth Schiffer.
LBG and TLG® wish to acknowledge the contribution of the Austrian Academy of Sciences that has generously supported the creation of the LBG and has now agreed to its online dissemination for the benefit of the scholarly community.

The Main Sanctuary of Amun-Re in the Temple of Hatshepsut at Deir El-Bahari

The Main Sanctuary of Amun-Re in the Temple of Hatshepsut at Deir El-Bahari
Z.E. Szafrański - editor, F. Pawlicki - text, A. Golijewska - layout and typesetting

Open Access Journal: Open Quaternary

Open Quaternary
ISSN: 2055-298X
Open Quaternary is an international peer-reviewed venue for contributions that consider the changing environment of the Quaternary, as well as the development of humanity. This scope is intentionally broad, and covers a range of specialisms such as geomorphology, palaeoclimatology, palaeobotany, palynology, vertebrate and invertebrate palaeontology, zooarchaeology, geoarchaeology, biological anthropology and Palaeolithic archaeology.
You can also read the Open Quaternary blog by clicking here.

Thursday, March 29, 2018

Inventory of Byzantine Churches on Cyprus

[First posted in AWOL 30 June 2015, updated 29 March 2018]

Inventory of Byzantine Churches on Cyprus
This collection of data was originally intended to serve as a tool and support for the author’s doctoral dissertation, dealing with the architecture of these buildings and its possible interpretations in the context of the island’s economy, demography and culture [Papacostas (1999a)]; but it is being made available online as an inventory to facilitate further research on the monuments. New discoveries constantly add to the corpus of relevant monuments, as does further study of the architecture and fresco decoration of structures hitherto ascribed to or appearing at first sight to date from later centuries. While this collection, therefore, is neither comprehensive, nor complete, largely representing the state of scholarship at the turn of the millennium, we hope that it can be of use to colleagues. In particular, we would encourage the use of the urls provided here to accompany relevant materials, particularly images, that they may be publishing online. 

We are extremely grateful to the A.G. Leventis Foundation, whose generous support has made this publication possible.

How to cite
The full bibliographical description of this publication: Tassos Papacostas, Inventory of Byzantine Churches on Cyprus, London 2015, ISBN 978-1-897747-31-5, available at http://ibcc.dighum.kcl.ac.uk/ This should be abbreviated to iBCC - so Church 15 can be described as iBCC 15, available at http://ibcc.dighum.kcl.ac.uk/entries/b0015.html

Categories

Material

Architectural Lantern Slides

Architectural Lantern Slides
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The University of Notre Dame’s Architecture Library holds a set of about 4,500 “lantern slides” produced by the French company G. Massiot & cie. The collection is undated, but the photographs appear to have been taken between approximately 1870 and 1914, primarily between 1890 and 1910. Lantern slides were most popular, and often sold as pedagogical sets, in the early decades of the 20th century.
European architecture, with approximately 2,900 of the photographs, is the primary focus of the collection. Most come from France (~1,000) and Italy (~800); other countries are represented, but in significantly lower numbers. Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and the Americas combined are pictured in fewer than 500 slides. The remaining ~1,200 photographs represent paintings, sculpture, and decorative arts.
In 2007, the slides were cleaned and transferred to archivally-sound storage boxes. A selection of about 2,700 were scanned as 4800 DPI TIFFs, and lower-resolution versions were loaded into a Flickr collection. An image cataloger was hired to prepare records for each.
Although detailed and modern images of many of these sites exist, the lantern slides present an historical look at the sites, including many bystanders and artifacts which were intentionally or unintentionally a part of the image. The Egyptian set includes images of workmen and bearers, in attire of the period and using tools of the time. Many European images include photographs of persons in attire of the period. Means of conveyance from ox- or horse-drawn wagon to automobiles and streetcars are in the background of some images. The lantern slides may therefore be of interest to a wider audience than architecture historians and students.
Arrangement: The slides are arranged into country-level sub-collections based on notes taken from the original lantern slides. Because these images were created during the late 19th and early 20th century, the names of these countries reflects the countries and occupied colonial territories of the time. Collections include information about the 2017 name of the country as well as older place names. Images themselves generally have more modern location data, often including latitude and longitude, included.

The Sportula: Microgrants for Classics Students

The Sportula: Microgrants for Classics Students
We provide microgrants to students equally regardless of institutional affiliation, research interests or academic merit, or political affiliation. Although our founders personally stand in solidarity with radical leftist student and economic justice movements, we are here for ALL students including ones who may disagree with our political philosophy. We believe that no one should have to pretend to be someone they’re not or curry favor with power just to get their most basic economic survival needs met.
This is also why we seek to formalize/supplement the informal systems of micro-help already existing in contemporary classics departments—because these systems are often based on creating or maintaining relationships with professors and as such are disproportionately available to students who are already comfortable/connected within academia...