Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Open Access Journal: Eugesta [Journal on Gender Studies in Antiquity]

[First posted in AWOL 18 December 2011. Updated 6 December 2016]

Eugesta [Journal on Gender Studies in Antiquity]
ISSN: 2265-8777
http://eugesta.recherche.univ-lille3.fr/revue/eng/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/eugesta-bandeau-1000x288-en-v3.png 
Le recours aux concepts de sexe et de genre développés dans les Gender Studies a considérablement transformé les recherches dans le domaine de l’Antiquité en ouvrant un nouveau champ extrêmement fructueux sur le plan culturel et social. Dans la mesure où elle est à l’origine de conceptions et valeurs auxquelles se réfèrent les constructions d’identités dans les cultures occidentales, l’Antiquité est un lieu d’application de ces théories tout à fait particulier. Les travaux menés sur les relations entre hommes, entre hommes et femmes, entre femmes, et sur les façons de construire le féminin et le masculin, ont jeté sur le fonctionnement des sociétés et cultures antiques, un éclairage nouveau, qui est aussi d’un intérêt capital pour l’étude de la réception de l’Antiquité dans les cultures occidentales.
Lire la suite…
The increased attention accorded to concepts of sex and gender developed by work in gender studies has powerfully transformed research in to the ancient Mediterranean past, opening up a new extremely fruitful field of cultural and social analysis. Inasmuch as many ideas and values responsible for shaping the construction of identities in later western societies originate in antiquity, applying gendered theoretical perspectives to the texts and artifacts surviving from the ancient world antiquity offers particular benefits. Inquiries conducted into the relations among men, between men and women, among women, and on modes of constructing what qualifies as “feminine” and “masculine” have brought a new illumination to the distinctive ways that ancient societies and cultures functioned, an illumination also of major relevance for research on the reception of antiquity in western cultures.
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Humanities Commons Launched

Humanities Commons
Dear Colleagues,

I am delighted to invite you to try out Humanities Commons, which launched in open beta last week. Humanities Commons is a nonprofit network where humanities scholars can share their work in a social, open-access repository, create a professional profile, discuss common interests, and develop new publications. The network is open to anyone working in or adjacent to the humanities.

Humanities Commons is a project of the office of scholarly communication at the Modern Language Association. Its development was generously funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Humanities Commons is based on the open-source Commons-in-a-Box project of the City University of New York and the CUNY Graduate Center and is an expansion of the MLA's MLA Commons, which launched in January 2013. The founding partner societies of Humanities Commons are the Association for Jewish Studies; the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies; and the College Art Association. Each society has its own Commons hub.

Humanities Commons was designed by scholarly societies in the humanities to serve the needs of humanists as they engage in teaching and research that benefit the larger community. Unlike other social and academic communities, Humanities Commons is open-access, open-source, and nonprofit. It is focused on providing a space to discuss, share, and store cutting-edge research and innovative pedagogy—not on generating profits from users' intellectual and personal data.

The network also features an open-access repository, the Commons Open Repository Exchange. CORE allows users to preserve their research and increase its reach by sharing it across disciplinary, institutional, and geographic boundaries. Humanities Commons members can deposit all kinds of scholarly materials in CORE: peer-reviewed journal articles, dissertations and theses; works in progress; conference papers; syllabi and teaching resources; abstracts; data sets; presentations; translations; book reviews; maps; charts; and more. Developed in partnership with Columbia University's Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, CORE provides robust preservation services, mints DOIs, and connects with the social functionality of Humanities Commons. CORE's development is underwritten in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities' Office of Digital Humanities.

Because this is a beta release, we're very interested in your feedback. Please submit feature requests, questions, and bug reports to our discussion group.

Contact the Humanities Commons team at hello@hcommons.org.
Best,

Nicky


--
Nicky Agate, PhD
Head of Digital Initiatives
Office of Scholarly Communication
Modern Language Association
@terrainsvagues
Follow Humanities Commons on Twitter @humcommons

Latinitium in litteris humanum

Latinitium in litteris humanum
Latinitium

What we offer

Here at Latinitium our purpose is to provide a wide selection of eclectic resources for everyone learning and/or teaching Latin. Our focus lies primarily on helping people teach themselves Latin by way of reading, listening, speaking and writing.
We aim to create a home for all things Latin, containing everything you need on your journey through the Latin language. Among the resources you will find here are:
  • Articles on methology, literature and more.
  • Videos & Podcasts in Latin on language, literature and random subjects.
  • Videos of high quality spoken Latin
  • Latin audio books of both prose and poetry.
  • Links  with descriptions to the best resources out there
  • Easy Latin stories with audio (Coming soon!)
Our aim and ambition for Latinitium is quite large, but we are starting out small; we are working hard to add new resources all the time.

Latinitium PODCAST – A Podcast ALL IN LATIN

Latinitium podcast is a podcast on various subjects, ranging from random subjects to particular expressions, literature and tips for learning Latin. The podcast is all in Latin. The difficulty varies with the subjects but overall I've tried to keep it at an intermediate level. I have provided transcriptions to make it more accessible. It's also available on iTunes here??.

BLOG WITH TIPS ON LEARNING & TEACHING LATIN

On the Latinitium blog I and others write on various subjects such as particularly useful books, Latin literature, methodology and anything Latin related.

MUDIRA: MUnich DIgital Research Archives

[First posted in AWOL 22 May 2013, update 6 December 2016]

MUDIRA: MUnich DIgital Research Archives
http://mudira.gwi.uni-muenchen.de/x/pic/screen.png
MUnich DIgital Research Archives ist ein im Frühjahr 2012 gestartetes Gemeinschaftsprojekt des Instituts für Ägyptologie der LMU München und des Staatlichen Museums Ägyptischer Kunst München (SMÄK), in welchem die umfangreichen Bildbestände beider Institutionen zu Altägypten digitalisiert und zugänglich gemacht werden. In der ersten (auf 2 bis 3 Jahre angelegten) Projektphase werden etwa 30.000 als Kleinbild-Diapositive vorliegende Originalaufnahmen aus Ägypten sowie von Beständen ägyptischer Museen und Sammlungen professionell gescannt und im Rahmen einer durch die IT-Gruppe Geisteswissenschaften (ITG) der LMU erstellten Datenbank online präsentiert. Ziele des Projektes sind die Erleichterung des Zugangs zu den Bildern, die wissenschaftliche Aufbereitung der dazugehörenden Informationen sowie letztendlich der Erhalt der oftmals wissenschaftshistorisch bedeutsamen Abbildungen auf einem zeitgemäßen Speichermedium. Der UNI DIA Verlag hat zudem seine knapp 6.000 Bilder zu Altägypten in digitalisierter Form zur Verfügung gestellt. Diese Bilder sind bereits komplett bearbeitet und abrufbar. In einem zweiten Schritt soll dann die Glasplattensammlung des Münchner Ägyptologischen Instituts digitalisiert und aufbereitet werden.

AVI : Attic Vase Inscriptions : Attische Vaseninschriften

 [First posted 9/24/09.  Updated 6 December 2016]

AVI : Attic Vase Inscriptions : Attische Vaseninschriften
Wachter, Rudolf

AVI (Attic Vase Inscriptions / Attische Vaseninschriften) is an extended and web-based continuation and development of Henry R. Immerwahr's CAVI (Corpus of Attic Vase Inscriptions). AVI's main part is the interactive database, which is now ready in its preliminary version, but we also provide informations about the project's prehistory (by Henry Immerwahr), protohistory, and present and future aims, bibliography (more than 3000 titles), as well as some texts on alphabets and phonology of the Attic dialect. 

You can download Henry Immerwahr's original CAVI as a pdf (version of January 2008, 7.7 MB, new version of January 2009, 6.8 MB, here mirrored from the original website, see also http://www.lib.unc.edu/dc/attic/index.html).

CAVI has been completely integrated into the AVI database, whereby, as a first step, the bibliographical references and many more things have been unified in order to make them searchable. The content has not been changed, however, except for small additions by R.W., added in double square brackets [[...]], and quite a few corrections, mainly in the bibliographical sections.

On 17 February 2010, I was happy to present our new site, designed and programmed by Simone Hiltscher. It replaces the first site of 2004. On 13 December our search form was put online, which allows you to search the database according to precise criteria. In February 2011, the free text search followed. In the meantime many new features have been added (see the third report). The next big step was to prepare the entry forms for additions, corrections, and photographs. The first (Insert Data) is ready and currently being tested, the second (Update Data) and third (Upload Images) will be ready by September 2016. From then on it will be very comfortable to enhance the AVI Database both for ourselves and for external (registered) collaborators. In November 2016 everything will be clear.

We hope you find AVI useful and interesting and hope you come back regularly.
Rudolf Wachter

Last update 2016-04-15

CAVI PDF (Jan. 2008)  
CAVI PDF (Jan. 2009)

Monday, December 5, 2016

New AMBROSIA Launched

New AMBROSIA Launched
 ASCSA
We are pleased to announce the launch of our new union online catalogue AMBROSIA! Home to the catalogues of the Gennadius, Blegen, Wiener Laboratory, and the British School, the new Ambrosia is simpler and easier to use.
New features include the ability to limit your search to books or journals only in a general keyword search. 

 
One can conduct a more advanced search by author, title, series, subject, publication date, publication place and more. 

 
Users can even simply browse through the titles.

 
Each catalogue can be both searched through and browsed through independently.

 
Our favorite updated feature is the inventory of new books added to the collection, listed month by month. 

 
Try it out here.

LATIN PLACE NAMES found in the imprints of books printed before 1801

[First posted in AWOL 13 August 2011, updated 5 December 2016]

LATIN PLACE NAMES found in the imprints of books printed before 1801 and their vernacular equivalents in AACR2 (Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules) form
A note on orthography: This database was compiled from the imprint information in cataloging records of several Anglo-American research libraries. Because these records were created over a long period of time and under different standards and rules of transcription, the orthography of the place names with respect to I/J and U/V/W does not necessarily reflect what was found in the original. Therefore, the orthography is standardized in this database. I/J will always be transcribed “I”; U/V will be transcribed “V” for upper case, and “u” for lower case; “VV,” “uu,” “Vu,” etc., will be transcribed “W.”

Main entry points for names are given in the locative case, as they generally appear in the books. Other forms, if they appear in early printed books, are given as cross references.

Places whose jurisdictions have changed over time may have more than one valid AACR2 form. Second and subsequent valid forms will be preceded by an equals sign (=). In the case of identical Latin forms that refer to different modern locations, the various AACR2 forms are presented without connecting equals signs.

Main entries accompanied by an asterisk (*) have a note giving the documentation for the place name. The main sources are:
  • R.A. Peddie, Place Names in Imprints : An Index to the Latin and Other Forms Used on Title Pages (1968) [cited as: Peddie]
  • J.G.T. Graesse, F. Benedict, and H. Plechl, Orbis Latinus : Lexikon lateinischer geographischer Namen des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit (1972) [cited as: Graesse]
Additional Resources

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Z